Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

LOUISVILLE AND JEFFERSONVILLE FERRY COMPANY v. KENTUCKY.

decided: February 23, 1903.

LOUISVILLE AND JEFFERSONVILLE FERRY COMPANY
v.
KENTUCKY.



ERROR TO THE COURT OF APPEALS OF THE STATE OF KENTUCKY.

Author: Harlan

[ 188 U.S. Page 391]

 MR. JUSTICE HARLAN, after making the foregoing statement, delivered the opinion of the court.

The ferry company insists that the judgment of the Court of Appeals of Kentucky, affirming the judgment of the court of original jurisdiction, (which sustained the action of the State Board of Valuation and Assessment,) had the effect to deny rights belonging to it under the Constitution of the United States.

It is appropriate here to state the grounds upon which the Court of Appeals of Kentucky proceeded. That court said: "The judgments from which the appeals are prosecuted are for the franchise tax for the years 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897, and 1898. The appellant is a corporation organized under a special act of the Legislature passed in 1869. It purchased a ferry franchise which had been originally granted by the territorial authorities of Indiana, which authorized the original grantee to conduct a ferry business across the Ohio River from Indiana to Kentucky. By regular devolution of title, through descents and conveyances, appellant owns the rights thus granted. The franchise thus acquired authorizes the appellant to transport persons and property from Jeffersonville, Indiana, to Louisville, Kentucky. There was vested in the Sinking Fund Commissioners of the city of Louisville title to the ferry rights along the Ohio River within the boundaries of that city, and by an agreement with them the appellant became the owner of it. The appellant owned certain ferry boats which are enrolled at the port of Louisville. It owned certain real estate in the State of Indiana. It has paid its taxes upon its real property in Indiana, and upon its personal property in this State. It has paid its taxes only upon its tangible property. It a appears to have no income except the revenue derived from carrying persons and property from one side of the river to the other. The

[ 188 U.S. Page 392]

     Board of Valuation and Assessment fixed the value of the franchise for the corporation as if it conducted all of its business in the territorial limits of the State of Kentucky, not deducting anything from that value on account of the fact that it exercised the privilege of conveying passengers from Jeffersonville to Louisville by reason of its acquisition of privileges which were originally granted under the laws of that State. . . . The appellant is a Kentucky corporation. The Board of Valuation and Assessment did not attempt to assess or tax its revenues coming from the exercise of its franchise in the transportation of persons and property over the Ohio River. But under certain sections of the Kentucky statutes, it assessed the value of appellant's franchise, which is its intangible property. The board did not assess or attempt to assess the property, either tangible or intangible, which it owned in the State of Indiana."

Again: "By virtue of its corporate authority the appellant acquired ferry boats, the ferry rights within the city of Louisville, which included the right to transport persons and property from Kentucky to Indiana over the Ohio River, and the necessary use of its wharf to carry on that business. It also, by contract (which its charter seems to have authorized it to do), acquired wharf privileges on the Indiana side, and also the right which had been previously granted by Indiana to transport persons and property from Indiana to Kentucky over the Ohio River. It also owns a park in Indiana. The property thus acquired constituted all of its property, tangible and intangible, in Kentucky and Indiana. Having thus acquired the foregoing property, and having profitably used it, its corporate franchise presumably became of the value fixed by the Board of Valuation and Assessment. If the franchise of the appellant became valuable by the acquisition of tangible or intangible property, or both, the effect is exactly the same, whether it is acquired in Indiana or in Kentucky, or both. It is not the tangible or intangible property in Indiana which the appellant acquired by purchase which is sought to be taxed, but the value of its franchise which has been created in, and now exists in, Kentucky. . . . The State of Kentucky is not attempting to impose a tax upon receiving and handling persons and property,

[ 188 U.S. Page 393]

     but is simply attempting to collect a franchise tax on the corporation created by law. . . . There is no doubt but what the business which the appellant carries on may be properly designated as 'interstate commerce,' and that it is a subject of national character; Congress having the authority and the power under the Constitution to regulate it. The State of Kentucky is not attempting to impose a tax upon receiving and handling persons and property, but is simply attempting to collect a franchise tax on the corporation created by law. As authorized by the laws and Constitution, the State is entitled to impose a tax upon its tangible property. . . . The appellant is domiciled in Kentucky, and the property sought to be taxed has its situs in Kentucky; and, as we have said, there is no attempt to tax the appellant's business, income, or revenues, but its income is alone considered in fixing the value of its franchise."

It thus appears from the admitted facts and from the opinion of the court below that the State Board, in its valuation and assessment of the franchise derived by that company from Kentucky, included the value of the franchise obtained from Indiana for a ferry from its shore to the Kentucky shore. In short, as stated by the Court of Appeals, the value of the franchise of the ferry company was fixed "as if it conducted all of its business in the territorial limits of the State of Kentucky," making no deduction for the value of the franchise obtained from Indiana.

The boundary of Kentucky extends only to low water mark on the western and northwestern banks of the Ohio River. Henderson Bridge Company v. Henderson City, 173 U.S. 592, 609-613, and authorities there cited. In that case it was said that although the jurisdiction of that Commonwealth for all the purposes for which any State possesses jurisdiction within its territorial limits was coextensive with its established boundaries, that jurisdiction was attended by the fundamental condition that it must not be exerted so as to entrench upon the authority of the National Government or to impair any rights secured or protected by the National Constitution.

So that the authority of the ferry company, ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.