Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

GAMBINO ET AL. v. UNITED STATES

decided: December 12, 1927.

GAMBINO ET AL
v.
UNITED STATES



CERTIORARI TO THE CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS FOR THE SECOND CIRCUIT.

Taft, Holmes, Van Devanter, McReynolds, Brandeis, Sutherland, Butler, Sanford, Stone

Author: Brandeis

[ 275 U.S. Page 312]

 MR. JUSTICE BRANDEIS delivered the opinion of the Court.

On August 1, 1924, Gambino and Lima were arrested by two New York state troopers, near the Canadian border; their automobile (while occupied by Gambino and therefore within the protection accorded to his person) was searched without a warrant; and intoxicating liquor found therein was seized. They, the liquor and other

[ 275 U.S. Page 313]

     property taken were immediately turned over to a federal deputy collector of customs for prosecution in the federal court for northern New York. There, the defendants were promptly indicted for conspiracy to import and transport liquor in violation of the National Prohibition Act. They moved seasonably, in advance of the trial and again later, for the suppression of the liquor as evidence and for its return, on the ground that the arrest, the search and the seizure were without a warrant and without probable cause, in violation of the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amendments of the Federal Constitution. The motion was denied; the evidence was introduced at the trial; the defendants were found guilty; and they were sentenced to fine and imprisonment. The Court of Appeals affirmed the judgment. Neither court delivered an opinion. This Court granted a writ of certiorari, 274 U.S. 733.

The Government contends that the evidence was admissible, because there was probable cause, Carroll v. United States, 267 U.S. 132, 153, and also because it was not shown that the state troopers were, at the time of the arrest, search and seizure, agents of the United States. The defendants contend that there was not probable cause and that the state troopers are to be deemed agents of the United States, because § 26 of Title II of the National Prohibition Act imposes the duty of arrest and seizure where liquor is being illegally transported, not only upon the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, his assistants and inspectors, but also upon "any officer of the law." We are of opinion on the facts, which it is unnecessary to detail, that there was not probable cause. We are also of opinion that the term "any officer of the law" used in § 26 refers only to federal officers, and that the troopers were not, at the time of the arrest and seizure, agents of the United States. Compare Dodge v. United States, 272 U.S. 530, 531.

[ 275 U.S. Page 314]

     But the National Prohibition Act, October 28, 1919, c. 85, Title II, § 2, 41 Stat. 305, 308, contemplated some cooperation between the state and the federal governments in the enforcement of the Act. Thus, § 2 made applicable the provisions of § 1014 of the Revised Statutes whereby state magistrates were authorized "agreeably to the usual mode of process against offenders in such State, and at the expense of the United States," to arrest and imprison, or bail, offenders against any law of the United States for trial before the federal court, and to require "recognizances of witnesses for their appearance to testify in the case." Section 2 also gave specific authority to the state magistrates to issue search warrants under the limitations fixed by the federal statutes. Act of June 15, 1917, c. 30, Title XI, 40 Stat. 217, 228. Evidence obtained through wrongful search and seizure by state officers who are cooperating with federal officials must be excluded. See Flagg v. United States, 233 Fed. 481, 483, approved in Silverthorne v. United States, 251 U.S. 385, 392. In Byars v. United States, 273 U.S. 28, 34, evidence obtained by state officers through search and seizure made without a warrant and without probable cause, but in the presence of a federal official, was held inadmissible. The question here is whether, although the state troopers were not agents of the United States, their relation to the federal prosecution was such as to require the exclusion of the evidence wrongfully obtained.

The Mullan-Gage Law -- the state prohibition act -- had been repealed in 1923. Act of June 1, 1923, c. 871, 1923 N. Y. Laws, p. 1690. There is no suggestion that the defendants were committing, at the time of the arrest, search and seizure, any state offense; or that they had done so in the past; or that the troopers believed that they had. Unless the troopers were authorized to make the arrest, search and seizure because they were aiding in the enforcement of a law of the United States, their action

[ 275 U.S. Page 315]

     would clearly have been wrongful even if they had had positive knowledge that the defendants were violating the federal law. No federal official was present at the search and seizure; and the defendants made no attempt to establish that the particular search and seizure was made in cooperation with federal officials. But facts of which we take judicial notice, compare Tempel v. United States, 248 U.S. 121, 130, make it clear that the state troopers believed that they were required by law to aid in enforcing the National Prohibition Act; and that they made this arrest, search and seizure, in the performance of that supposed duty, solely for the purpose of aiding in the federal prosecution.

In the memorandum filed by the Governor approving the Act which repealed the Mullan-Gage law, he declared that all peace officers, thus including state troopers, are required to aid in the enforcement of the federal law "with as much force and as much vigor as they would enforce any State law or local ordinance"; and that the repeal of the Mullan-Gage law should make no difference in their action, except that thereafter the peace officers must take the ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.