Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

MINNEAPOLIS v. BORUM

decided: May 23, 1932.

MINNEAPOLIS, ST. PAUL & SAULT STE. MARIE RAILROAD CO
v.
BORUM



CERTIORARI TO THE SUPREME COURT OF MINNESOTA.

Hughes, Van Devanter, McReynolds, Brandeis, Sutherland, Butler, Stone, Roberts, Cardozo

Author: Butler

[ 286 U.S. Page 447]

 MR. JUSTICE BUTLER delivered the opinion of the Court.

In October, 1921, petitioner accepted respondent's application for work as a switchman, and the latter in December, 1928, was injured while employed in interstate

[ 286 U.S. Page 448]

     transportation. He brought this action in the district court of Hennepin county to recover damages under the Federal Employers Liability Act (45 U. S. C., §§ 51-59) and, after issue was joined, the parties made an agreement for arbitration under a statute of Minnesota (G. S. 1923, §§ 9513-9519) pursuant to which the company paid plaintiff $12,500 to be retained by him in any event. And it was agreed that, if the arbitrators found for plaintiff on the merits, the award should be $12,500 in addition to the amount so paid. The arbitrators made findings of fact and held that plaintiff's injuries were caused by defendant's negligence and that he was entitled to recover the stipulated amount. A motion made by defendant to vacate having been denied, the district court entered judgment for plaintiff in accordance with the award and the supreme court affirmed. 184 Minn. 126; 238 N. W. 4.

Defendant's contention here is that the state court erred in sustaining the finding that plaintiff was an employee within the meaning of the Act as construed in Minneapolis, St. P. & S. S. M. Ry. Co. v. Rock, 279 U.S. 410.

Plaintiff made application in writing to defendant for employment as switchman. Then, and continuously thereafter while plaintiff worked for it, defendant had a rule, No. 16, promulgated to promote safety and efficiency in the operation of its railroad, which declared that no person over 45 years should be taken into the service. Another rule, No. 22, was to the effect that applications for employment in the yard service not rejected within 30 days would be considered accepted. And there was one, No. 4 (A), stating that all employees who attain the age of 65 will be retired.

When plaintiff made his application he was 49 years old and understood that defendant had a rule against accepting men over 45 to work in its train service. He falsely stated in his application that he was 38 years old and,

[ 286 U.S. Page 449]

     when submitting to a physical examination required of applicants for employment, he again so misrepresented his age. This statement was relied upon by the examining surgeon and was in part the basis of his finding and report that plaintiff was in good health and acceptable physical condition. It was a general practice of men, over the age specified in the rule, when applying for such work on the railroads of defendant and other carriers in the Northwest, falsely to represent their ages to be within the specified limit, and that practice was known to the defendant. The arbitrators were unable to find whether defendant knew plaintiff was over 45 years. They did not find, nor does the evidence require a finding, that defendant was deceived by plaintiff's false statements or that it accepted his application because of or in reliance upon them. The application was not rejected within 30 days and, under rule 22, must be deemed to have been finally accepted. Under the terms of the contract of hiring, defendant did not, without more, have the right to remove plaintiff from its service on account of such misrepresentation. Plaintiff worked for defendant as a switchman for about seven years and when injured was well under the age for retirement. His work was satisfactory. Neither his age nor his physical condition contributed to cause his injury.

In Minneapolis, St. P. & S. S. M. Ry. Co. v. Rock, supra, this Court held that one who obtained employment as a switchman for an interstate carrier by railroad by fraudulently evading the company's rule requiring applicants to submit to a physical examination and who suffered injury in the course of employment in interstate transportation, while the company remained unaware of the deception, was not as of right an employee within the meaning, or entitled to ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.