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MADERAZO v. FARRELL

January 7, 1970

Minda MADERAZO, Plaintiff,
v.
Raymond FARRELL, Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, Defendant


Matthews, Senior District Judge.


The opinion of the court was delivered by: MATTHEWS

MATTHEWS, Senior District Judge.

 The motion of the defendant to dismiss the complaint or, in the alternative, for summary judgment is before the Court. In her papers opposing the defendant's motion for summary judgment, the plaintiff has requested summary judgment in her favor, *fn1" and this has been treated by the Court as a motion by plaintiff for summary judgment. The Court has considered the motions, the points and authorities in support of and in opposition to the motions, the record including the Immigration and Naturalization Service records and exhibits, the briefs of the parties and the argument of counsel in open court. The following facts appear therein without substantial controversy.

 1. The instant action is one wherein plaintiff seeks a judgment declaring (1) that the denial by defendant of her petition for classification as a lawyer under section 203(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended, *fn2" was arbitrary, capricious and contrary to law, and (2) that she is entitled to a third preference visa classification.

 2. The plaintiff, a 41-year old woman, is a native and citizen of the Philippines.

 3. She was graduated from the University of the Philippines in April 1953 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws.

 4. On January 27, 1954, plaintiff was admitted to the Philippine Bar.

 5. Following her admission to the Bar, plaintiff was an associate in a law firm in Manila for several months. Because her compensation there was quite small, she accepted a position with a manufacturing company in its department of market research. She remained with this company until October 16, 1956 at which time she was admitted to the United States as a visitor.

 6. On June 10, 1957 plaintiff was granted a change of nonimmigrant status to that of a student to study "commercial subjects" at an adult school and then transferred to the University of San Francisco to work toward a baccalaureate degree in Philosophy.

 7. On April 29, 1959 she was granted a change of nonimmigrant status to that of a foreign government employee to work as "secretary in the office of the representative of the Commission of Tourism of the Philippines in San Francisco." In 1965 she became secretary to the Assistant Vice-President of the Philippine National Bank in San Francisco where she remained until February 1969. She was last admitted to the United States at San Francisco on October 30, 1968 for "duration of status" as a foreign government employee under section 101(a)(15)(A)(ii) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended.

 8. On February 26, 1969 plaintiff began employment in a law office in San Francisco as a "law and research clerk." On the same day she filed a petition for classification as a member of the professions *fn3" as a lawyer (a third preference classification) pursuant to Section 203(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended, 8 U.S.C. § 1153(a)(3), this being at the San Francisco office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

 9. Due to an injury to her hand in an accident, plaintiff discontinued on March 28, 1969 the employment at the San Francisco law office which she had commenced on February 26, 1969. *fn4"

 10. There is in the Immigration and Naturalization Service record herein a signed statement (purporting to be an affidavit) by plaintiff. In it she indicates that in the course of her work in this country she learned that an "especially large group making up California's foreign population are persons of Philippine origin", that she became acquainted with many lawyers who serve the large Filipino community in California, and that she formed the opinion "that in the United States there are great opportunities in the field of law, especially for one who is a member of a minority group," and that she "decided to clerk in law offices" where she "could earn a living, acquire knowledge of the substantive and procedural law and gain practical experience", and that she intends "to practice or engage" in her profession. *fn5" Moreover, in her statement she indicated an awareness that to be certified for admission and a license to practice law a person must be a citizen of the United States. *fn6"

 11. On April 4, 1969 the District Director, Immigration and Naturalization Service, [San Francisco] denied plaintiff's visa petition for third preference immigrant classification on the ground that she had "failed to establish" that she is "a qualified member of the professions and will engage in a professional occupation ...


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