Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

PERKINS v. DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

July 29, 1991

DEBORAH PERKINS, Plaintiff,
v.
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, Defendant


John Garrett Penn, United States District Judge.


The opinion of the court was delivered by: PENN

JOHN GARRETT PENN, UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE

 This case arises under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended by the Equal Employment Opportunity Act, 42 U.S.C.A. section 2000e, et seq. (West 1981 & 1990 Supp.), *fn1" and the District of Columbia Human Rights Act, D.C. Code sections 1-2501 et seq. (1981). *fn2" Plaintiff Deborah Perkins, a black female, works as an Administrative Aide (typist), DS-6, for the Bureau of Parking Services of the District of Columbia Department of Public Works. Perkins alleges that she is a victim of discrimination on the basis of her race because she was not selected to fill the position of Parking Security Specialist, DS-7/9, in 1981. The selectee in 1981 was a white female. Perkins also alleges that she was a victim of discrimination on the basis of her sex because she was not selected to fill the position of Parking Operations Specialist, DS-7/9/11, in May 1986. The selectee in 1986 was a black male. In addition, plaintiff alleges that in 1978 she was the victim of sex discrimination in connection with her job reassignment from the Office of Youth Advocacy to the Department of Transportation.

 This matter is presently before the Court on defendant's Motion for Summary Judgment. After a thorough review of the pleadings, exhibits, and the entire record herein, the Court concludes that defendant's motion should be granted in part and denied in part on the terms set forth below.

 I. BACKGROUND

 On July 26, 1981, Perkins was reassigned to an Administrative Aide (typist), DS-6, position, which she currently holds. From February 25, 1985 to July 14, 1986, Perkins was detailed to perform an "Unclassified Set of Duties." During this detail, Perkins served as a parking operations specialist trainee.

 In 1978, Katherine Kuzemka, a white female, commenced employment with the D.C. Department of Transportation as a Supervisory Parking Control Aide, GS-6. Kuzemka was promoted to Parking Security Specialist, DS-9, effective June 3, 1981, and to Parking Security Specialist, DS-11, effective January 6, 1985. During 1984, Kuzemka was detailed to perform an "Unclassified Set of Duties" which comprised those duties which would be performed by a trainee for Parking Operations Specialist position. On February 15, 1987, Kuzemka was reassigned to a position as a Parking Operations Specialist, DS-11.

 In May 1986, the position of Parking Operations Specialist, DS-7/9/11, was posted for competition. Both Perkins and Smith applied for the vacancy. The Office of Personnel notified Perkins that she was among those qualified to apply for the position, and her name was submitted along with four other eligibles on the Selection Certificate. Smith was selected for the position.

 Perkins filed a charge of discrimination with the D.C. Office of Human Rights on December 3, 1986. The Office of Human Rights issued an initial decision finding no probable cause on February 4, 1987; Perkins' appeal of this decision was denied on March 24, 1989. On April 13, 1989, Perkins filed a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC"). The EEOC issued its final determination and a right to sue notice on May 31, 1990. On August 27, 1990, plaintiff filed the instant action.

 II. ANALYSIS

 Summary judgment is proper where "the pleadings, depositions, answers to interrogatories, and admissions on file, together with the affidavits, if any, show that there is no genuine issue as to any material fact and that the moving party is entitled to judgment as a matter of law." Fed. R. Civ. P. 56(c). Rule 56(c) mandates the entry of summary judgment, after adequate time for discovery, against a party who fails to make a showing sufficient to establish the existence of an element essential to that party's case, and on which that party will bear the burden of proof at trial. Celotex Corp. v. Catrett, 477 U.S. 317, 106 S. Ct. 2548, 91 L. Ed. 2d 265 (1986). Since defendant, the party moving for summary judgment, has the burden of proving the lack of any genuine issue of fact, the Court must view the available facts in the light most favorable to plaintiff. Minihan v. American Pharmaceutical Ass'n, 259 U.S. App. D.C. 10, 812 F.2d 726, 727 (D.C. Cir. 1987). There is no issue for trial unless there is sufficient evidence favoring the non-moving party for a jury to return a verdict for that party. Anderson v. Liberty Lobby, Inc., 477 U.S. 242, 106 S. Ct. 2505, 91 L. Ed. 2d 202 (1986).

 To withstand a motion for summary judgment, the non-moving party must demonstrate that there exists a genuine dispute as to one or more facts material to the outcome of the litigation. The facts which are material to the outcome of a case are those that the governing substantive law recognize as relevant. Liberty Lobby, 477 U.S. at 248. Since this case involves claims of disparate treatment on the bases of race and sex, the material facts are those which speak to the elements of the analytical framework laid down in Title VII by the Supreme Court in McDonnell Douglas Corp. v. Green, 411 U.S. 792, 802-805, 93 S. Ct. 1817, 1824-1825, 36 L. Ed. 2d 668 (1973), and its progeny. *fn3" It is necessary for plaintiff to indicate that there is some evidence to demonstrate that her race and gender played a role in the challenged agency actions.

 First, plaintiff must prove a prima facie case of discrimination by a preponderance of the evidence. Proof of a prima facie case gives rise to a rebuttable presumption or inference of discrimination. U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors v. Aikens, 460 U.S. 711, 714, 103 S. Ct. 1478, 1481, 75 L. Ed. 2d 403 (1983). In order to establish a prima facie case, Perkins must show (1) that she belongs to a class of persons protected by Title VII (2) that she applied for and was qualified for the promotion for which she was not selected; (3) that despite her qualifications, she was rejected; and (4) that the plaintiff was rejected at the same time that another employee of similar qualifications who was not a ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.