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In re Greenwald

October 24, 2002

IN RE JOHN DOYLE GREENWALD, RESPONDENT.


An Applicant for Admission to the Bar of the District of Columbia Court of Appeals (M47966)

Before Terry and Reid, Associate Judges, and Belson, Senior Judge.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Per Curiam

Applicant John Doyle Greenwald seeks admission to the Bar pursuant to D.C. App. R. 46 (c)(3)(i). Greenwald is a member of the New York Bar and has been in private practice in the District of Columbia since 1981. His work in the District of Columbia consists primarily of representing clients before the United States International Trade Commission, the Department of Commerce, and agencies of foreign countries.

The Committee on Admissions referred Greenwald's application to the Committee on Unauthorized Practice of Law, which determined that Greenwald had engaged in the unauthorized practice of law in at least some aspects of his practice. Although initially believing in good faith that none of his practice required admission to the District of Columbia Bar, Greenwald now acknowledges that he engaged in the unauthorized practice of law, particularly insofar as he gave legal advice from an office in the District of Columbia. *fn1

The Committee on Admissions has concluded that Greenwald's years of unauthorized practice do not reflect negatively on his character and fitness to practice law, and recommends that we grant him admission to the Bar. Essentially for the reasons stated in its report, which we attach hereto and incorporate by reference, we accept the Committee on Admissions' conclusion that Greenwald possesses the good moral character and general fitness to practice law that are required by D.C. App. R. 46 (d). *fn2 Accordingly, we adopt the recommendation of the Committee and grant Greenwald's application for admission to the Bar of the District of Columbia.

So ordered.

APPENDIX

FINDINGS OF FACT, CONCLUSIONS OF LAW AND RECOMMENDATION OF THE COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS

John Doyle Greenwald, a member of the New York Bar, has applied for admission to the District of Columbia Bar pursuant to D.C. App. R. 46 (c)(3)(i), which permits an attorney who has been a member in good standing of the Bar of another jurisdiction for at least five years to be admitted without examination. Mr. Greenwald's application revealed that he had been a partner in various District of Columbia law firms since 1981 without ever being admitted to the District of Columbia Bar. The Committee referred his application to the Committee on Unauthorized Practice of Law ("CUPL") for its evaluation of whether Mr. Greenwald had engaged in the unauthorized practice of law in violation of D.C. App. R. 49. After receiving an affirmative response, this Committee convened a formal hearing pursuant to D.C. App. R. 46 (f) to determine whether Mr. Greenwald possesses the requisite character and fitness for admission to the Bar. The Committee now recommends that his application be granted.

FINDINGS OF FACT

A. Background

Mr. Greenwald graduated from the University of North Carolina in 1967. R. 10. *fn3 After serving in the Peace Corps for two years, he enrolled at Columbia University Law School, from which he graduated in 1972. R. 10, 13. After his graduation from law school, he was employed as an associate at the New York firm of Sullivan & Cromwell for about a year and a half. R. 18. He was admitted to the New York Bar in 1973. R. 2.

Mr. Greenwald came to the District of Columbia in 1974, and served in several positions in the federal government for the next seven years. Between 1974 and 1979, he was an attorney advisor and later deputy general counsel in the Office of the United States Trade Representative. After that, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Import Administration in the Department of Commerce until May 1981. R. 16-17. He then began the private practice of law in the District of Columbia, serving as counsel and then as partner in the firm of Verner, Lipfert, Bernhard, McPherson and Hand until December 1983. R. 15. In January 1984, he became a partner in the firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering, and has remained there. R. 14. While in private ...


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