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Minebea Co., Ltd. v. Papst

January 27, 2005

MINEBEA CO., LTD., ET AL., PLAINTIFFS,
v.
GEORG PAPST, ET AL., DEFENDANTS.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Paul L. Friedman United States District Judge

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

Both Minebea and Papst have filed objections to the Special Master's Report and Recommendation No. 7. Report and Recommendation No. 7 was issued in response to Minebea's motion for an order deeming certain facts as established and precluding Papst from introducing evidence on certain designated matters. Minebea argued that preclusion was warranted because of Papst's egregious conduct with respect to discovery in this matter. See Report and Recommendation No. 7 ("R&R 7") at 3. Specifically, Minebea criticized the testimony and conduct of Georg Papst, Jerold Schnayer and Richard Smith and their alleged "stonewalling" during depositions, see id., with respect to (a) the witnesses' purportedly faulty recollections; (b) the improper invocation of attorney-client privilege and work product protections, and (c) conferences between counsel and witnesses during depositions. See id.*fn1

The Special Master recommended that Minebea's motion be denied with respect to the specific relief sought. Instead, he recommended that the Court enter an Order:

1. Compelling Papst's lay witnesses and its counsel, including Messrs. Jerold Schnayer and Richard Smith, to respond to questions such as those set out in Exhibits 6-11 to the motion.

2. Precluding Papst from relying on, and counsel from tendering an argument to this Court based on, (a) any specific information or fact as to which any Papst counsel or lay witness has first-hand knowledge which the witness has refused on grounds of privilege or work product protection to reveal on deposition, unless the specific information is available from another competent and unrestricted source, and (b) any of the subjects in (1), if henceforth counsel or a lay witness refuses to testify as prescribed in Section (1) or (3).

3. Permitting Minebea, if it so elects to re-examine Messers. Georg Papst, Schnayer and Smith on any subject as to which the witness has heretofore refused to testify on privilege or work product protection grounds. The witness shall respond to any question set out in Exhibits 6-11 which the witness has heretofore refused to answer on either or both of those grounds.

See R&R 7 at 18-19.

Since the issuance of Report and Recommendation No. 7, the parties have conducted further depositions. As a result, Minebea filed a Supplementation Regarding its Objections to Report and Recommendation No. 7 which alleged further bad behavior by Papst during the depositions of attorneys Jeffrey Salmon and A. Sidney Katz as well as the continued depositions of attorneys Jerold Schnayer and Richard Smith. See Supplementation Regarding its Objections to Report and Recommendation No. 7 ("Minebea Supplementation") at 2. The Court heard oral argument on Papst's motion to reject the Special Master's Report and Recommendation No. 7 on October 18, 2004.

The Court agrees, for the reasons stated in Report and Recommendation No. 7, with the Special Master's ruling refusing to grant the specific relief requested by Minebea. Specifically, the Special Master declined to deem as established the facts that there are no exceptions to Papst's internal numbering system and that Minebea's motors have no substantial commercially viable use except in hard disk drives. The Court also agrees that Minebea's request for an order precluding Papst from introducing evidence on certain issues should be denied without prejudice. The Court agrees that the extreme sanction of preclusion, particularly on the broad range of topics suggested by Minebea, would be premature.*fn2 The time to raise issues of preclusion is after the close of discovery. The Court therefore will reject Minebea's objections to Report and Recommendation No. 7.

I. PAPST'S OBJECTIONS

Papst has raised a number of objections to the Special Master's conclusions, which the Court will aggregate into several groups: (a) Papst patent prosecutions and license negotiations were in anticipation of litigation and counsel's past mental impressions in connection with them therefore are protected; (b) current mental impressions and "personal opinions" of counsel for Papst are not discoverable; (c) overly broad questions should not be answered if they might elicit privileged material; and (d) the concerns related to Georg Papst's testimony were resolved in subsequent depositions.

A. Patent Prosecutions and License Negotiations

The Court notes that since its oral rulings involving privilege and work product on October 19, 2004, Papst has produced over 90 percent of the documents it previously had withheld as privileged. See Notice of Papst's Compliance with Order Dated October 21, 2004. The parties are reminded that these same oral rulings have equal force in connection with Papst's conduct during depositions. As this Court already has ruled, the privilege law as stated by the UNITED STATES COURT OF APPEALS for the District of Columbia Circuit applies in this case. See Transcript of October 19, 2004 Motions Hearing ("Oct. 19 Tr.") at 63. Papst is in the business of licensing patents, and license negotiations are not, by definition, in anticipation of litigation and are not, without more, protected by the work product privilege. See id. at 68. Similarly, the prosecution of patents is not generally protected by the work product privilege. See id. The Court noted in its rulings that Mr. Schnayer frequently wore a "businessman's hat" in this case and "if a lawyer is wearing a businessman's hat, there's a presumption that it's not privileged by attorney-client privilege or by work product." See id. at 70.

Although it should not be necessary for the Court again to address the issue of what does and does not qualify as "in anticipation of litigation," the Court will reiterate here that "[w]hile litigation need not be imminent or certain in order to satisfy the anticipation-of-litigation prong of the test, this circuit has held that 'at the very least some articulable claim, likely to lead to litigation, must have arisen,' such that litigation was 'fairly foreseeable at the time' the materials were prepared." Hertzberg v. Veneman, ...


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