Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Khadar v. Bush

September 15, 2006

KHADAR
v.
BUSH
ANAM
v.
BUSH
ABDAH
v.
BUSH
AL QOSI
v.
BUSH
PARACHA
v.
BUSH
DEGHAYES
v.
BUSH
MUSTAPHA
v.
BUSH
AL MOHAMMED
v.
BUSH
EL-MASHAD
v.
BUSH
AL-WAZAN
v.
BUSH
AL-ANAZI
v.
BUSH
BATARFI
v.
BUSH
QAYED
v.
BUSH
AL-SHIHRY
v.
BUSH
AZIZ
v.
BUSH
AL-OSHAN
v.
BUSH
TUMANI
v.
BUSH
SALAHI
v.
BUSH
ERRACHIDI
v.
BUSH
ABOASSY
v.
BUSH
HABASHI
v.
BUSH
KHIALI-GUL
v.
BUSH
MUHIBULLAH
v.
BUSH
WAHAB
v.
BUSH
GUL
v.
BUSH
SOHAIL
v.
BUSH
TOHIRJANOVICH
v.
BUSH
AL KARIM
v.
BUSH
SARAJUDDIN
v.
BUSH
MOHAMMED
v.
BUSH
MANGUT
v.
BUSH
HAMAD
v.
BUSH
ZUHOOR
v.
BUSH
AL-HELA
v.
BUSH
MOUSOVI
v.
BUSH
KHALIFH
v.
BUSH
ZALITA
v.
BUSH
AHMED
v.
BUSH
GHALIB
v.
BUSH
BUKHARI
v.
BUSH
SAIB
v.
BUSH
HATIM
v.
BUSH
AL-SUBAIY
v.
BUSH
SADKHAN
v.
BUSH
FAIZULLAH
v.
BUSH
FARAJ
v.
BUSH
KHAN
v.
BUSH
KIYEMBA
v.
BUSH
IDRIS
v.
BUSH
RABBANI
v.
BUSH
ALMERFEDI
v.
BUSH
KABIR (SADAR DOE)
v.
BUSH
AL-RUBAISH
v.
BUSH
AL-QAHTANI
v.
BUSH
ALKHEMISI
v.
BUSH
GAMIL
v.
BUSH
AL-SHABANY
v.
RUMSFELD
MOHAMMED OTHMAN
v.
BUSH
AL-MUDAFARI
v.
BUSH
ALHAG
v.
BUSH
AL-SHIMRANI
v.
BUSH
AL SHARBI
v.
BUSH
ZADRAN
v.
BUSH
ALSAAEI
v.
BUSH
RAZAKAH
v.
BUSH
AL-GHIZZAWI
v.
BUSH
AWAD
v.
BUSH
AL HALMANDY
v.
BUSH
AL SALAMI
v.
BUSH
HUSSEIN
v.
BUSH
AL-DELEBANY
v.
BUSH
AL-HARBI
v.
BUSH



The opinion of the court was delivered by: James Robertson United States District Judge

MEMORANDUM ORDER

In each of the Guantanamo Bay habeas cases pending in this Court, the government has moved for approval of its plan for reviewing documents seized from detainees as part of an investigation of three apparently coordinated suicides in June 2006. The plan calls for the use of a "Filter Team," walled off from government investigators and prosecutors, that would review the seized materials and set aside anything arguably protected by the attorney-client privilege. The motion is strongly opposed by the petitioner detainees, many of whom have cross-moved for the return of documents that have been impounded, or for contempt sanctions, or both. After considering the briefs of the parties and reviewing the transcript of a lengthy hearing on the same motion before Judge Richard Leon in August 2006, I have decided to grant the government's motion. This ruling will be without prejudice to petitioners' cross-motions, which will be taken up and decided at a later time. The reasons for my decision are set forth below. My order will apply in each of the above-captioned cases.*fn1

BACKGROUND

In most of the Guantanamo habeas cases, communications between detainees and their counsel are governed by a protective order.*fn2 The protective order facilitates counsel's access to their detainee clients with an eye to protecting national security interests. Am. Prot. Order ¶ 2. It sets forth procedures for all contact between detainees and their counsel, as well as rules governing counsel's exposure to classified information. An implicit premise of the protective order is that communication between detainees and their counsel enjoys the protection of the attorney-client privilege. See Am. Prot. Order ¶ 28 (noting that the presence of security officials "shall not operate as a waiver of, limit, or otherwise render inapplicable, the attorney-client privilege or work product protections.").

Annexed to the protective order are Revised Procedures for Counsel Access. These procedures address the logistics of counsel visits and attorney-client mail in greater detail. Again, the attorney-client privilege is referenced only indirectly, such as in the definition of legal mail. See Am. Prot. Order Ex. A.II.E. (legal mail includes "privileged documents"). Legal mail sent by counsel to detainees is to be opened by a "Privilege Team" that searches the mail for prohibited physical contraband. Compliant mail is to be forwarded to military personnel in sealed and marked envelopes; GTMO personnel are then to deliver these envelopes to the recipient detainee without opening them. Am. Prot. Order Ex. A. IV.A.3-4. The Revised Procedures also include rules for material that is taken in and out of legal meetings, classification review of information communicated by detainees to counsel, provision of paper for the drafting of legal mail by detainees, and the circumstances under which phone calls between detainees and counsel may be permitted.

On June 10, 2006, three Guantanamo detainees were discovered dead in their cells. Respt's Mot. For Procedures Related to Review of Certain Detainee Materials & Req. For Expedited Briefing at 3 ("Respt's Mot."). News reports suggest that the three detainees hanged themselves using torn bed sheets. Id.*fn3 The triple suicides were the most recent and extreme incidents in a string of detainee security violations at the Guantanamo Bay facility. On May 18, 2006, several detainees in a communal housing facility ambushed and assaulted Guantanamo guards with makeshift weapons; on the same day, two Guantanamo Bay detainees overdosed on medications provided by the facility. Id. at 4. Guantanamo personnel have since uncovered systematic, unauthorized stockpiling of medications by detainees. Id.

The NCIS began investigating the apparent suicides immediately.*fn4 Declaration of Special Agent in Charge Carol Kisthardt ¶ 3 ("Kisthardt Decl."). Investigators started searching the cells of the deceased detainees. Id. They found what appeared to be handwritten suicide notes on the bodies of the three detainees. Id. Another handwritten note related to the suicides was discovered in a mesh wall of one of the deceased detainees' cells. Id. The note discovered in the wall was "written in Arabic on notepaper that had been stamped 'Attorney Client Privilege,'" and the name used by the author differed from the name of the deceased detainee who had lived in the cell.*fn5 Id.

Investigators then broadened their search to include other occupied cells in the same cellblock. Id. While searching the cellblock, investigators discovered handwritten notes they believed to be relevant, "potentially authored by at least two of the deceased detainees," in the cell of a detainee other than the three suicide victims. According to Special Agent Kisthardt, many of these notes were written on stationery stamped with indicia of privilege: "Attorney-Client Communication," "Privileged and Confidential," etc. Id.

After discovering three notes on the bodies of the deceased, one suicide-related note in the cell one of the deceased, and a number of relevant notes in a fourth cell on the same cellblock, the NCIS decided to "expand the scope of the search." Id. ¶ 4. According to Special Agent Kisthardt, the purpose of the expanded search was to "pursue logical investigative leads concerning the deaths of the three detainees and to determine whether other suicides were planned or likely to be planned." Id. The expansion of the search was quite dramatic: NCIS investigators seized all materials from the cells of all detainees in the entire Guantanamo facility.*fn6 The materials collected weighed 1,100 pounds and included "personal items and papers, including legal material and other correspondence." Id.

NCIS investigators sorted the seized materials and placed them into small bags labeled with detainee-identifying information such as inmate number, camp, cell block, and cell number. Supp. Dec. Carol Kisthardt ¶ 3 ("Kisthardt Supp. Decl."). These small bags were then put into grocery-sized paper bags. Id. Eventually the larger bags were taken to NCIS offices and placed in sealed cardboard boxes in a secure setting. Id. On June 18, 2006, NCIS investigators began sorting through the bags. Id. at ¶ 4.

The scope of the initial sort is the subject of some controversy. On July 7, 2006, the government represented that "materials from bags pertaining to eleven detainees" were sorted. Kisthardt Decl. ¶ 5. Over a month later, the government filed a Supplemental Memorandum correcting this assertion. In fact, the detainee-specific bags of "approximately 155 detainees" were searched. Kisthardt Supp. Decl. ¶ 5. Investigators had not searched the materials of eleven detainees, as originally claimed, but had searched eleven bags containing material belonging to 155 detainees. Id.

Materials contained in the first eleven grocery bags were sorted as follows: materials "that appeared even remotely to be possible Attorney Client Privileged information" were placed in one pile, and materials with no indicia of privilege were placed in a second pile. Kisthardt Supp. Decl. ¶ 5. Materials deemed non-privileged were scanned for potential relevance to the suicide investigation. Id. Among the materials in this category, investigators discovered two items they considered relevant: a document containing information on tying knots, and, from a different cell, a "JTF-GTMO generated email that appeared to contain classified or sensitive information regarding cell locations of detainees as well as details concerning camp operational matters." Kisthardt Decl. ¶ 5. While searching through other materials taken from the cell in which the JTF-GTMO generated email had been found, NCIS found three envelopes marked attorney-client privileged. Id. Special Agent Kisthardt opened these envelopes and "looked at" but did not read the contents. Id. One contained a document with a "Secret" stamp crossed out and "Unclassified" written in its place, a second contained a document marked "FOUO" (presumably, for official use only), and a third contained documents without notable markings. Id. It was at this point that NCIS - faced with difficulties such as the multitude of languages represented in the documents, the large volume of materials, and the need for guidance in handling privileged materials - suspended further examination of the impounded materials. Id.

The government's own account of NCIS's activities paint a picture of an investigation that has been scattershot and disorganized. Not only did the government provide inconsistent accounts of what types of materials were impounded and the scope of its initial examination of those impounded materials, but it was more than a month before the government advised the court of its dramatic underestimate of the initial document review. Agent Kisthardt's attribution of this error to an "inadvertent oversight with respect to the wording of [the] prior declaration," Kisthardt Supp. Decl. ¶ 4, does not inspire confidence. Nor does Agent Kisthardt's explanation of how investigators chose the first eleven bags to sort: they were chosen because they "appeared to be among the lightest and least full." Id. ¶ 5. The petitioners' allegations of illogical, inconsistent, and perhaps improper activities on the part of NCIS up to this point are for another day, however. The question of whether and how NCIS may proceed from this point forward with its review of the 1,100 pounds of seized material is more pressing.

The government asks the Court to "establish procedures authorizing the review of impounded materials" that may be potentially subject to the attorney-client privilege and proposes the procedures it has in mind. Respt's Mot. at 1. A "Filter Team" would review and sort the impounded materials for relevance and for privilege. The Filter Team would have the same qualifications required of the Privilege Team, Access Procedures §§ II.D, and would include Department of Defense attorneys or Navy JAG attorneys and "other personnel and translators who have not and will not take part in litigation or other proceedings involving detainees, and who will operate under appropriate non-disclosure obligations." Respt's Mot. at 1-2.

The Filter Team would sort through the impounded materials with the following mandates: (1) material found to be irrelevant to the NCIS investigation will be returned to the detainee "if privileged attorney-client communication, or, otherwise, to JTF-Guantanamo for appropriate action;" (2) material found to be non-privileged and potentially relevant will be turned over to NCIS investigators; (3) material found to be at least arguably privileged and potentially relevant will be presented to the court and to detainee's counsel: such material will not be disclosed to anyone else without consent of counsel or court authorization. Respt's Mot. at 10-11. Like the Privilege Team created by the Access Procedures, the Filter Team would be permitted to disclose immediately any information ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.