Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

George Town Club at Suter's Tavern v. Salamanca

April 5, 2007

THE GEORGE TOWN CLUB AT SUTER'S TAVERN, PETITIONER,
v.
GILBERTO SALAMANCA, RESPONDENT.



The opinion of the court was delivered by: Emmet G. Sullivan United States District Judge

MEMORANDUM OPINION

Respondent Gilberto Salamanca brought an action in the Superior Court for the District of Columbia against his former employer, the George Town Club at Suter's Tavern ("the Club"), alleging wrongful termination of employment based on race discrimination and retaliation, and health insurance law violations under 29 U.S.C. § 1162(3) ("COBRA"). The Club subsequently filed in this Court a Petition to Compel Arbitration under the Federal Arbitration Act ("FAA"), 9 U.S.C. §§ 1-16, which seeks enforcement of an arbitration agreement between respondent and petitioner and is currently pending. Upon consideration of the petition, the response and reply thereto, the arguments made at the hearing on March 9, 2007, the applicable law, and the entire record, the Court determines that petitioner is unable to demonstrate the existence of a binding arbitration agreement between the two parties. Therefore, for the reasons stated herein, petitioner's petition to compel arbitration is DENIED.

BACKGROUND*fn1

Petitioner is a non-profit private dining club in the District of Columbia. In 1997, petitioner hired respondent as a part-time parking valet. At or about the time respondent was hired, he received a copy of the petitioner's Employee Manual. This manual contained a "Binding Arbitration" provision, which set forth an arbitration policy: "Any controversy arising from this Manual or related to employment with the Club shall be resolved in arbitration in Washington, D.C. The agreement to arbitrate includes controversies based upon federal and DC equal employment opportunity laws, as well as other kinds of disputes."

Upon receiving the Employee Manual with the aforementioned arbitration provision, respondent was neither asked to sign nor did he sign petitioner's standard "Acknowledgment of Employee Manual" form. The "Acknowledgment of Employee Manual" form reads in full:

I have received and read (or had read to me) the Historic George Town Club Employee Manual and agree to abide by and observe the policies and procedures described therein. I understand that this manual supercedes all previous manuals.

I understand that nothing in the Manual may be construed to be an expressed or implied contract of employment, but rather an overview of working policies and benefits, that the policies and benefits may change from time-to-time as business necessitates.

I further agree that any controversy arising out of, or related to, my employment with the Club, including but not limited to controversy concerning equal employment opportunity rights created by federal law and by the law of the District of Columbia, shall be resolved by arbitration, pursuant to the Federal Arbitration Act, and that the method of selecting arbitrators is that set forth in the Manual. I also consent to the jurisdiction of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia for all purposes in connection with arbitration.

I understand that it is a condition of my employment that I read (or have read to me) this manual.

In 1998, respondent was promoted to a full-time waiter position. Two years later, in 2000, the petitioner's Employee Manual was replaced by a new manual, which contained the same arbitration policy language as the previous edition. Upon receipt of the new manual, respondent was neither asked to sign nor signed petitioner's "Acknowledgment of Employee Manual" form. Nevertheless, respondent remained a full-time waiter at the Club until his discharge in September 2006.

On November 17, 2006, respondent filed a complaint in the Superior Court for the District of Columbia against the petitioner, alleging wrongful termination of employment based on race discrimination and retaliation under the D.C. Human Rights Act and health insurance law violations under COBRA. Respondent's complaint cited multiple provisions of the petitioner's Employee Manual to support his claims on how the petitioner failed to follow its own policies in relation to its treatment and termination of respondent, but the complaint neither alleges that the Employee Manual is a contract nor does it assert any claims for breach of the Employee Manual.

On December 8, 2006, petitioner's counsel, by letter to respondent's counsel, demanded that respondent agree to arbitrate his claims. In response, on December 12, 2006, respondent's counsel requested in a letter that the petitioner clarify its position on whether its demands for arbitration rested upon the arbitration policy within the Employee Manual. That same day, petitioner's counsel responded by letter that the demands for arbitration were not premised upon the arbitration policy within the Employee Manual, but rather upon the separate arbitration agreements set forth in the "Acknowledgment of Employee Manual" forms, which were included with the response.

On December 13, 2006, respondent's counsel received the "Acknowledgment of Employee Manual" forms, but none of them were for respondent. In addition to respondent, two former Club employees, Melaku Teferra and Samuel Romero, brought similar discrimination suits against the petitioner. Respondent's counsel represents Teferra and Romero, as well as another Club employee, Iginio Ballarin. Petitioner sent respondent's counsel "Acknowledgment of Employee Manual" forms for Teferra, Romero, and Ballarin, but failed to produce a form for respondent.

The Club filed a Petition to Compel Arbitration in this Court on December 22, 2006, seeking an order directing the parties to arbitrate respondent's Superior Court claims. The petition is based on the arbitration clause in the Employee Manual. Respondent refuses to withdraw his complaint in Superior Court, arguing that he has no contractual obligation to arbitrate since the arbitration ...


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.