Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Official citation and/or docket number and footnotes (if any) for this case available with purchase.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

PGP Group LLC v. National Railroad Passenger Corp.

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA


September 8, 2010

PGP GROUP LLC, PLAINTIFF,
v.
NATIONAL RAILROAD PASSENGER CORPORATION, DEFENDANT.

The opinion of the court was delivered by: Ellen Segal Huvelle United States District Judge

MEMORANDUM OPINION AND ORDER

Plaintiff PGP Group LLC d/b/a Atlas Companies ("Atlas") has sued defendant National Railroad Passenger Corporation ("Amtrak"), seeking to prevent defendant from awarding a contract for the installation of fencing. Before the Court are plaintiff's motions for a temporary restraining order ("TRO") and a preliminary injunction. Based on its review of the parties' filings, applicable case law, and the arguments of counsel at a hearing held on September 8, 2010, and for the reasons stated in open court, it is hereby ORDERED that plaintiff's motions are DENIED.

"A preliminary injunction is an 'extraordinary and drastic remedy.'" Munaf v. Geren, 553 U.S. 674 (2008) (quoting11A C. Wright, A. Miller, & M. Kane, Federal Practice and Procedure § 2948, p. 129 (2d ed. 1995)). On a motion for a temporary restraining order or a preliminary injunction under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 65, the Court must balance four factors: 1) the movant's showing of a substantial likelihood of success on the merits of his claims, 2) a showing of irreparable harm to the movant, 3) a showing that an injunction would not result in substantial harm to the non-movant, and 4) public interest. Davis v. Pension Benefit Guar. Corp., 571 F.3d 1288, 1291 (D.C. Cir. 2009). It is not enough for a plaintiff to show the possibility of irreparable injury; rather, it must "demonstrate that irreparable injury is likely in the absence of an injunction." Winter v. Natural Res. Def. Council, Inc., 129 S.Ct. 365, 375 (2008) (emphasis in original).

As ruled in open court, plaintiff has failed to satisfy his burden since it has not shown a substantial likelihood of success on the merits or that it is likely to suffer irreparable injury. With respect to the merits, plaintiff has not shown that it is likely to prevail on its breach of contract claim. Second, as to irreparable injury, plaintiff argues that without an injunction, it stands to lose profits and overhead on work it may not be hired to do if Amtrak is permitted to solicit new proposals. However, plaintiff has shown merely that such damages are possible, not that they are likely. Moreover, Atlas has made no showing that such losses, if incurred, could not be calculated to some degree of reasonable certainty given the cap on plaintiff's existing contract with Amtrak. Because "mere economic loss" does not "support a finding of irreparable injury," Wisconsin Gas Co. v. FERC, 758 F.2d 669, 675 (D.C. Cir. 1985), Atlas has not demonstrated that it is likely to suffer irreparable injury if its motions for a TRO and a preliminary injunction are not granted.*fn1

Accordingly, the Court DENIES plaintiff's motions for a TRO and a preliminary injunction.

SO ORDERED.


Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Official citation and/or docket number and footnotes (if any) for this case available with purchase.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.